Ethics in Social Media Marketing: Responding to the Boston Tragedy

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Let’s examine two brands’ actions last week, during the frightening events in Boston: one from NBC Bay Area and the other from Ford.

 

Joshua Belliveau‘s insight:

During any tragic event we see many messages of hope and support from people and companies posted online.  If you’re thinking of sending such a message for your brand, be sure you step back and review your messaging.  Have others review it to ensure your social media message isn’t actually going to damage your brand.  When emotions are already high, the public will quickly see through your attempt at free publicity if it is not, in fact, a sincere message of hope for those affected.  Have you seen brand messages that angered you?  What were they?

See on socialmediatoday.com

Using Social Media to Advance the Fire Department Mission | Firefighter Nation

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Social media is a force to be reckoned with—one that many departments fear, in part due to some high-profile incidents in which social media posts resulted in disciplinary action against firefighters.

 

Joshua Belliveau‘s insight:

This article serves as a reference for some of the ways that non-profits, or public service entities are using social media.  I know that I’ve seen it more and more frequently.  And in fact, it’s one of the primary ways I get up-to-date information about traffic, weather, and at times even police events in the rural town where I live.  Have you tried using Twitter, FaceBook or any other social media to communicate with your community?  What have you seen as the challenges?

See on www.firefighternation.com